Home Coming Revolution

Home Coming Revolution

CELEBRATE A LIFE LIKE NO OTHER

It was Madiba himself who inspired the creation of Home Coming Revolution in 1999 in Trafalgar Square with his message to South Africans, “I love you all so much, I want to put you in my pocket and take you home”.

It may be the end of an era, but not of the legacy. Father, husband, peacemaker, mentor and master, our beloved Madiba was many things to many people, and most of all, an inspirational leader. 

Home Coming Revolution

To celebrate the remarkable life and achievements of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, Homecoming Revolution has commissioned different South African artists to create different portraits of Madiba’s remarkable life.

If you’d like to show the world how much he means to us, you can choose any of these portraits to upload as your Facebook Profile & Cover Picture.


The Home Coming Revolution was a rather lonely voice in the wilderness when it was first launched in 2002 to bring back South Africans who had moved overseas. But this country’s relative immunity to the fallout from the financial crisis compared with many other places has worked in the organization’s favor. Click Link Below "Homecoming Revolution" (New Up-to-date Website!)

People realized that their homeland was not a bad place to build a lifeespecially with the entire continent now open for business. Many appear to have chosen Cape Town as their return destination.

Home Coming Revolution

Gary Leih, former CEO of Ogilvy Group UK, who’s back with an inspired new venture, says: “Not for no reason did [travel website] TripAdvisor for the past two years vote Cape Town the best city in the world to visit. Moving to South Africa Like any of his nomadic compatriots , Leih has done some to ing and fro ing. He first left SA and his award-winning agency The White House after Chris Hani’s assassination two decades ago, taking his wife and small daughters to Sydney, where he launched a brand consultancy.It was bought by TBWA, and he became MD of TBWA.



Impressed with the changeover in SA, he returned home in 2000as group MD of Ogilvy SA , which included Ogilvy Africa. “I took to the job immediately, but the family struggled.My wife had left a career in Sydney, and my teenage daughters had had to leave friends and a very different schooling system,” he says. However, in 2005 the challenge offered by the position of CEO of Ogilvy UK, with a seat on Ogilvy ’s worldwide board , was irresistible, and he again left, this time for London, with his wife and younger daughter.

The older one stayed behind, studying at the University of Cape Town.A few years later, after resigning to start his own agency , Leih elected to sit out his restraint of trade in SA. That was when his two daughters, who had by then returned from traveling the world, decided Cape Town was the place to settle. “We all fell in love with living in Cape Town again. And so I reached the point where I needed to ask myself: “What could I, a 53-year-old white male, do to make some contribution to the new SA ?”

What he did was make a bold move: he transformed the old post office in Muizenberg into funky new offices housing an advertising agency called OFyt (Old Friends, Young Talent), dedicated to skills transfer in the communications industry. The old friends who are mentoring the young talent are Loeries winner Jono Shubitz and banker- turned-airline industry marketer Paul Newman. “We are just a few months old, but early indications are that this idea will work,” says Leih. “The young talent is infusing their work with township culture. “The agency will contribute to developing an SA identity for locally produced advertising, moving it away from its current European and US bias.

                     Home Coming Revolution

Home Coming Revolution

Another returned former Ogilvy adman is Jason Harrison, whose blue-chip accounts  have included Old Mutual, SABMiller and Volkswagen. Just back from London,he’s taken up a position as managing partner of M&C Saatchi Abel. When he and his girlfriend left SA six years ago he was 28. “I wanted to prove to myself that I could make it happen at the center of the world with the very best. ” A specialist in building brands in restricted environments, he got a job working in different roles at British American Tobacco.It was just after his first child was born that he decided to move back.

“Having children in the UK becomes a costly exercise. Mike Abel had always been a mentor of mine and when he said he was bringing South Africans back home to help him start M&C Saatchi Abel, it all clicked into place. I knew the people and had enormous respect for them.

Home Coming Revolution

“Luckily I had kept my SA bank accounts and my flat in SA, so I had some record of who I was when we returned. But mates of mine had a nightmare just getting their identity back on their return. You also have to re adjust expectations and frustration levels. Things take longer, there’s more red tape and less customer service. “But we could not be happier.

In general you just go with the flow. It’s refreshing, in a way, after London.” Marc Sternberg — SA’s Entrepreneur of the Year for 2011 relocated to Sydney in 2003. He was 28, a qualified CA with a new wife.“Sentiment in the country was negative and most of our school and university colleagues were leaving.

The norm was to plan a future overseas, where politically and economically things would be more stable.” He got a job as general manager of Vodafone Rental , operating airport rental kiosks and stores across Australia. The couple’s scattered siblings would reunite with them on Oz soil — that was the plan. “They all duly visited and soon told us they would not be coming to Sydney from London/Singapore/Toronto/New York. Meanwhile, the nine-hour time change made keeping in touch with our parents in SA difficult, and the prospect of subjecting them to intercontinental grand parenting preyed on our minds. So did the idea of raising our kids as Aussies, a culture very foreign to us.

“And we desperately missed the SA gees — the energy and friendliness from people you encounter every day, from the car guard helping you parallel park to new business colleagues and friends. “As modern, safe and affluent as Australia is, it lacks that warm familiarity.” After three years he decided to return and start his own business here. Aware of how sparse access to cash and banking services were in SA , he set about researching the convenience ATM market. n“I travelled the world; speaking to ATM deployers, researching hardware suppliers, systems, switches and banks.” He and his wife, Tanya, launched Spark ATM Systems, with Chungho Comnet in Korea as the hardware supplier and Capitec Bank as the banking partner, and it’s now a multimillion-rand business.

Like Harrison and Sternberg, Tim Henshall was 28 an attorney working as legal adviser for 7-Eleven Corp in SA when he relocated with his wife to London to gain international work experience and to travel. “For us it was an adventure. That gets you through the tough things like the commute, the grey and the rain. There was always something new to experience.” Henshall worked for the legal department of the Bank of New York Mellon for nine years, then came home and launched Henshall & Associates, a company that provides legal services to both the English and SA markets. “SA is in my blood and the yearning to return never went away,” says Henshall, now 39. “Family was a strong pull, as well as the outdoors lifestyle. Having children also changed things.Though security and the uncertainty over where the country is going are still concerns, I have accepted that there is always bad news out there regarding SA’s future. But somehow, as a country, we get through.”

Home Coming Revolution

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The ManpowerGroup’s 2012 Talent Shortage Survey has named engineers, drivers and skilled tradespeople at the top of the list of the hardest skills to find in South Africa, along with teachers, technicians and legal staff within the top 10. Read more...

Home Coming Revolution continues to try and identify these vacancies for returning South Africans, so if you are looking to move back in 2013, keep an eye on the latest job vacancies posted across industry sectors, on the Homecoming Revolution careers portal.

This weeks top jobs:

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